The volume of convict labor records covers the dates and includes information describing the physical attributes of the convict, how the convict was employed, name of the party hiring the convict, date of the hire, price at which the convict was hired, the amount credited for employment, amount of fine and costs due by the convict, and the amount collected by the county. Neither volume is indexed. In , the Texas legislature enacted a law allowing the county to hire out to a private individual or company anyone convicted of a misdemeanor or petty offense who was subsequently jailed for failure to pay his or her fine and court costs.

The work could continue until the money generated covered all amounts owed. Anyone hiring a convict had to execute a bond payable to the county judge ensuring the prompt payment of all amounts due to the county. The hirer also had to guarantee he would treat the convict humanely, he would provide the convict with "a sufficient quantity of good and wholesome food, comfortable clothing, and medicine when sick," and he would not require the convict to work unreasonable hours or for a longer time during the day than other laborers doing the same kind of work. The county judge was required to record all of the transactions in books maintained by the county clerk.

Convict labor bonds were approved by the county judge and filed in the office of the county clerk. These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, the volume of convict labor bonds is arranged numerically by bond number; the volume of convict labor records is arranged chronologically by date of hiring. Oaths of county judges and commissioners, , 1 volume. Before taking office, the county judge and county commissioners were required to swear an oath. The oath and certificate of the officer administering the oath were then filed and recorded with the clerk of the county court.

Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 55, Section 16 The register of oaths required to be maintained by the county clerk dating includes the name of the county official, the date the oath was administered, the name of the individual administering the oath, and a transcription of the oath of office.

The volume is not indexed. Identify the item , Oaths of county judges and commissioners, Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. County officer ledgers, , undated, 4 volumes. County officer ledgers maintained by the county clerk include accounts for each office holder or fund and reflect total amounts in each account or fund each month.

The dates covered are and undated. The information for each office holder or fund varies by the source of the money collected. The county clerk's account includes fees and jury fees; the district clerk's account includes jury fees and stenographer fees. For the tax assessor-collector, the information includes delinquent taxes, interest on daily deposits, occupation taxes, poll taxes, ad valorem taxes, penalties, special taxes, and commissions on auto licenses.

All of the amounts reflect monthly totals; no information on amounts collected from individuals is recorded. For volume 1, only the entries for the year are indexed. The undated index to volume 2 of the county officer ledgers includes the type of account and page numbers. Volume 3 is indexed within the volume.

The county clerk was required to keep a ledger of accounts for every officer of the county, district, or state who was authorized to collect or receive any money for the use of or belonging to the county Acts , 23rd Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter , Section 1; recodified at Art.

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Each county officer was required to report the amounts collected to the county clerk. Internally, the ledger volumes are arranged by office holder or fund and within each account the information is arranged chronologically by month. Internally, the index volume is arranged alphabetically by type of account. Business and professional records, , , , undated, 38 volumes. The Texas legislature has assigned to the county clerk the responsibility for recording and maintaining records related to business and professional activity in the county.

The records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office related to business and professional activity were recorded and maintained by the county clerk pursuant to different statutes and for different purposes. They consist of butchers livestock slaughter records, a register of occupation licenses, liquor dealer records, a register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, a register of assignment of accounts receivable, and an index to factors' lien records dating overall , , , and undated.

The legislature required certain businesses, such as liquor dealers, to register with the county, pay a business tax, and post a bond. Other occupations required the county clerk to issue a license upon the payment of a tax. Because Galveston was a busy cotton port, the legislature passed laws requiring commission merchants and contracting stevedores to file bonds with the county clerk before they could conduct business.

To protect the health and safety of residents, butchers were required to provide records of the livestock they slaughtered. The legislature also recognized the importance of protecting business interests by requiring the recording of assignments of accounts receivables and factors' liens. Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, , 1 volume.

Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, , 1 volume. Register of assignments of accounts receivable, , undated, 2 volumes. Identify the item and cite the subseries , Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. The record of the reports of butchers in Galveston County of animals sold or slaughtered dating includes a description of the animal, including any brands, the name of the butcher, and the date. In , the Texas legislature enacted a statute regulating the "sale, alienation, removal, or transfer of animals" and requiring anyone engaged in the slaughter of animals for market to report to the police court a description of every animal slaughtered and to exhibit to the sheriff or clerk of the county court the hides of the slaughtered beef.

A report was required to be made at a regular meeting of the court. The county clerk was required to record the report and make it available for inspection upon request. Data in the volume are arranged by the name of the butcher and then chronologically by date of the record. Identify the item , Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records.

Records of bills of sale and the reports of butchers of Galveston County of animals slaughtered by them, Register of occupation licenses, , 1 volume.

The register of occupation licenses, entitled State and County Licenses Issued by the District Clerk of Galveston County , includes the date of the license, name of the parties to whom the license was issued, license number, sheriff's receipt number, period for which the license was issued, character of the license, amount due the state, and amount due the county. The dates covered are The types of occupations for which licenses were issued included selling liquor by the glass, one-horse peddler, keeping one billiard table, selling liquor by the quart, keeping a first-class hotel, exhibiting a panorama, operating a Daguerrean gallery, commission merchant, and cotton broker.

Because licenses were issued for a fixed period of time, several of the persons listed in the volume obtained licenses quarterly or annually and appear multiple times in the volume. The volume was maintained by the Galveston County District Clerk who transferred it to the Galveston County Clerk after that office was restored in The Congress of Texas first authorized the collection of occupational taxes during the Republic as one means of raising public revenue.

The first occupations taxed were wholesale and retail dealers in wares, goods or merchandise; retailers of wines or spirituous liquors; and operators of nine-pin bowling alleys Acts, First Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 12, In , the 1st Texas Legislature created a state tax on certain occupations, and subsequent legislatures added and deleted the occupations subject to licensure taxes. By the end of the Civil War, retailers of wines and spirituous liquors and operators of billiard tables and nine- or ten-pin alleys, whether used for pleasure or profit, continued to be taxed, but the legislature had added peddlers, theaters, circuses, menageries, waxworks, shows of any kind, concerts, and lectures, among others Acts , 11th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter During Reconstruction, the named occupations for which taxes were required included selling spirituous, vinous, malt or other intoxicating liquors; selling beer; operators of billiard, bagatelle, pigeon hole, and Jenny Lind tables; nine- and ten-pin bowling alleys; foot peddlers; horse peddlers; transient theatres; circuses; menageries, waxworks, or other exhibitions; concerts; cook shops and eating houses; livery stables; distilleries and breweries; traveling agents; dealers in stocks or bills of exchange; physicians, surgeons, and dentists; attorneys; operators of Daguerrean galleries; and land agents Acts , 12th Legislature, Called Session, Chapter 82; Acts , 13th Regular Session, Chapter To obtain a license, a person applied to the designated tax collector and paid the appropriate taxes.


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The person was issued a receipt which was then taken to the district clerk who issued the license. For the law, the sheriff collected all occupation taxes. The law designated that some occupation taxes were collected on behalf of the state by the county sheriff, and some occupation taxes were collected on behalf of the county by the county treasurer. Identify the item , Register of occupation licenses, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records.

Liquor dealer records, , undated, 32 volumes. Liquor dealer records were kept by the Galveston County Clerk's Office in accordance with laws regulating the sale of liquor. They consist of records of retail malt liquor dealer bonds filed by applicants, records of retail spiritous liquor dealer bonds filed by applicants, and records of liquor license approvals and denials reflecting the changes in the law requiring the county judge to grant or deny liquor licenses dating overall and undated. Retailers of wines and spirituous liquors were among the first occupations taxed by the Congress of the Republic of Texas Acts, First Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 12, Liquor dealers were taxed continuously in every occupation tax law adopted by the legislature throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

In , the Texas legislature enacted a new law regulating the sale of liquor Acts , 23rd Regular Session, Chapter ; codified at Art. In , the Texas legislature further regulated the sale of liquor Acts , 30th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter ; codified at Art. This act required persons or firms desiring a license as a retail liquor or retail malt dealer to apply to the state Comptroller of Public Accounts for a permit to apply for a license. The Comptroller investigated the application and acted upon it, after which the county judge of the county in which the applicant wished to operate his business, granted or refused the license and recorded his judgment in a book preserved by the county clerk.

If approved, the applicant paid the appropriate tax, the tax collector issued a receipt, and the county clerk issued the license. In , the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors or medicated bitters within Texas, except for medicinal, scientific, mechanical, or sacramental purposes Acts , 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter For these excepted purposes only, the state continued to issue licenses through the Comptroller of Public Accounts.

This act of the legislature, passed partly as an emergency wartime measure, preceded the 18th Amendment to the U. Constitution, which was ratified in , became effective in , and was not repealed until Liquor license application approvals, , undated, 5 volumes. Identify the item and cite the subseries , Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Retail malt dealer bonds, , undated 16 volumes. Registers of bonds posted by retail malt liquor dealers include the bond posted by retail malt liquor dealer applicants, date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number.

Dates covered are and undated. Separate indexes to volumes 13 and 14 include the names of licensees and the corresponding page numbers from the register volumes.

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Volumes 1 through 12 are indexed within the volumes. In , the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of malt liquor within Texas Acts , 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24 , and the responsibility of the county clerk to receive liquor dealer bonds ended. Internally, each register volume is arranged numerically by license number. Internally, the index volumes are arranged alphabetically by licensee surname.

Identify the item , Retail malt dealer bonds, Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Volume 1, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, December January Volume 2, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, January November Retail liquor dealer bonds, , undated, 11 volumes.

Registers of bonds posted by retail dealers of spiritous liquor include the bond posted by retail liquor dealer applicants, date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number. Separate indexes to volumes 6 and 10 include the names of the licensees and corresponding page numbers from the register volumes. Volumes 1 through 5 are indexed within the volumes. Volumes 7 and 9 are not indexed.

In , the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous liquors within Texas Acts , 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24 , and the responsibility of the county clerk to receive these bonds ended. Identify the item , Retail liquor dealer bonds, Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Volume 1, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, January March Volume 2, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, March September Volume 3, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, October July Volume 9, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, November July Volume 10, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, July December Registers of liquor license approvals, granted by the Galveston County Judge and maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office, include the name of the petitioner, date, case number, application number, type of license, and fees collected.

Because licenses were renewable, a licensee may appear several times within a volume. A separate index to volumes 8 and 9 includes the names of the licensees and corresponding page numbers from the register volumes. Volume 7 is not indexed. Volume 10 is indexed within the volume. In , the Texas legislature further regulated the sale of liquor by requiring persons or firms desiring a license as a retail liquor dealer or retail malt dealer first to apply for a permit from the state Comptroller of Public Accounts.

Once the Comptroller investigated the application and acted on it, the county judge of the county in which the applicant wished to operate his business granted or refused the license and recorded his judgment in a book filed and maintained by the county clerk. In , the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors within Texas Acts , 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter At that time, the role of the county judge in the approval or denial of licenses and the role of the county clerk in issuing licenses ended.

Internally, the index volume is arranged alphabetically by licensee's surname. Identify the item , Liquor license application approvals, Liquor dealer records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Several recording functions for the Galveston County Clerk resulted from Galveston's position as a shipping port. Laws passed early in the twentieth century required shipping-related businesses, such as commission merchants and contracting stevedores, to post bonds to ensure their faithful performance on their agreements. This register, titled Bonds of Commission Merchants, Contracting Stevedores, and Live-Stock Commission Merchants , includes the bond posted by the commission merchant or contracting stevedore, the date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number.

The dates covered for commission merchants bonds are ; the dates covered for contracting stevedores bonds are The volume is indexed. Despite the volume's title, no livestock commission merchant bonds are included. A commission merchant was defined as a person or business that sells produce, goods, wares or merchandise on consignment for a commission. Since , laws delineated the ways commission merchants could conduct their business.

County clerks approved the bonds, then filed and recorded them. Acts , 30th Regular Session, Chapter 38; codified at Art. The bond was payable to the county judge.

The county judge of the county in which the merchant maintained an office had to approve the bond and then it was filed in the county clerk's office. Acts , 33rd Regular Session, Chapter 94; codified at Art.

Additionally, in the Texas legislature adopted a law regulating the occupation of contracting stevedore Acts , 33rd Regular Session, Chapter 82; codified at Art. A contracting stevedore was defined as a person or business that contracted to load or unload any vessel, ship, or water craft.

A stevedore was defined as the laborer who worked for a contracting stevedore, and who actually loaded or unloaded a vessel, ship or water craft. The bond was conditioned on the contracting stevedore paying each laborer his wages promptly on Saturday of each week and performing all agreements. The county clerk approved the bond, then filed and recorded it. Data in the volume are arranged by type of bond: commission merchant or contracting stevedore.

Within each section, the bonds are arranged chronologically. Identify the item , Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Volume 1, Bonds of commission merchants and contracting stevedores, In , in response to new lending practices, the Texas legislature passed a law to protect the assignment of accounts receivable Acts , 49th Leg, Regular Session, Chapter ; codified at Art.

The register of assignments of accounts receivable includes file number, date of notice, date and time filed, name and address of assignor, name and address of assignee, period of assignment, date of release, and remarks. The index to the register volume includes name of assignor, name of assignee, and page number of the register volume in which the notice is filed. During the Depression of the s, Texas businesses, like businesses across the country, suffered from a shortage of unsecured commercial loans.

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One result was the expansion of the use of accounts receivable by banks and other lenders as security for business loans. Because this type of lending was relatively new, there were few notice requirements. By the mids, banks and other creditors were demanding notice-filing legislation that would protect their interests and ensure that businesses did not pledge their accounts receivables as collateral to multiple lenders.

The filed notice was intended to protect holders of these assignments from being superseded by the claims of subsequent lenders. Pemberton, Jr. Assignments of accounts receivable could be protected by the assignor delivering a signed written instrument describing and assigning the particular accounts to the assignee and by filing for record a "Notice of Assignment" with the county clerk's office of the county in which the assignor resided. The "Notice of Assignment" was required to include the name and address of the assignor and the assignee, a statement that the assignor had or would assign one or more accounts to the assignee, and a statement of the period of time in which the notice would be effective.

The county clerk was required to receive, file and index the notices of assignment. Data in the register volume are arranged chronologically. The index volume entries are arranged alphabetically by names of the assignor and assignee. Identify the item , Register of assignments of accounts receivable, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Factors' lien records, after , 1 volume. Like assignees of accounts receivables, factors soon determined that they also needed protection of their business interests to ensure that the claims of subsequent lenders did not supersede their claims.

The index to factors' liens filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office includes filing number, name and address of borrower, and name and address of factor. The volume is undated; however, its creation antedates the statute in which factors' liens were created The location of the register of notices of the creation of factors' liens, to which this volume is an index, is unknown.

In , the Texas legislature enacted a law providing for the creation of a lien by written agreement between a factor and a borrower Acts , 50th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter ; codified at Art. A factor was defined as a person or business that advances money on the security of merchandise, whether or not they are employed to sell the merchandise. The borrower was the owner of the merchandise who created a lien in favor of a factor. By written agreement with the borrower, a factor created a lien on the borrower's merchandise which secured the factor for any and all loans and advances to the borrower.

A notice of the lien was required to be filed with the county clerk in each county in which merchandise subject to the lien was located. The clerk was required to mark the lien with a file number, the date and hour of filing, and to note and index the lien in a "suitable index" arranged by name of the borrower.

Entries in the volume are arranged alphabetically by name of borrower. Identify the item , Factors' lien records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Census registers are lists of names for each of the enumeration districts created by the census enumerator in which were to be posted with the Galveston County Clerk's Office in accordance with the enumeration instructions.

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Information includes names, color "white, black, mulatto, Chinese, Indian" , sex, and age at last birthday prior to June 1, The date covered is Although not indexed, the volumes are arranged alphabetically within each enumeration district. Volume 2 includes Wards 6 through The United States began conducting a decennial census in For each census, the US Congress would establish the requirements for conducting the census, including the requirements to be followed by each enumerator.

The initial requirements for the census were adopted by Congress on March 3, The census, for the first time, included the relationship of each person enumerated to the head of the household; whether the person was single, married, widowed, or divorced; and the place of birth of the person's parents. An amendment to the requirements, passed on April 20, , required enumerators, before forwarding the completed census schedules to the district supervisor, to make and file in the office of the county clerk, a list of names, ages, sex, and color, of all persons enumerated.

He was required to advertise at three or more public places that he would be at the courthouse on the fifth and sixth days after filing the list excluding Sunday for the purpose of correcting his enumeration. Anyone who was improperly enumerated or omitted from the enumeration could appear and make a case for correcting the information or being included. Source: Carroll D.

These volumes are arranged by enumeration district. Within each enumeration district, the information is arranged alphabetically by surname. Identify the item , Census registers, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Marriage records consist of notices of intention to marry recorded by the Galveston County Clerk's Office dating Information includes application number, name, age, and residence of applicant, the name of the applicant's intended spouse, and an acknowledgment by the county clerk.

Each applicant groom and bride completed a separate form. The first Congress of the Republic of Texas assigned to the county clerk the responsibility of issuing marriage licenses, determining the eligibility of the parties to marry, and recording the license return after the marriage ceremony was performed by an authorized person Acts , 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 5, After statehood, Texas authorized county clerks to record all marriage contracts Acts , 1st Legislature, Regular Session, 12 May In , the legislature required the consent of a parent or guardian before a woman under the age of 18 or a man under the age of 21 could marry Acts , 32nd Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter In , the legislature further regulated the issuance of marriage licenses by county clerks Acts , 41st Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter ; codified at Art.

The clerk was required to examine applicants under oath as to age and residence and could not issue a license until three days after the application was filed. County clerks were required to record the applications in a book titled, Notice of Intention to Marry. Before a license could be issued, the man was required to provide to the clerk a doctor's certificate showing that he was free from all venereal disease. Identify the item , Marriage records, Galveston County Clerk's office records.

Real and personal property records, , , , undated, 95 volumes. One of the earliest statutory responsibilities assigned to county clerks was the recording of real property and related documents. Real and personal property records were created and maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office pursuant to specific statutes and for different, but related, purposes. They consist of file indexes, deed book transcriptions, acknowledgment statements by county clerks, acknowledgment records of notaries public, chattel mortgages, and automobile registrations dating overall , , , and undated.

The first Congress of the Republic of Texas directed the clerks of the county courts to "be the recorders for their respective counties, and it shall be their duty to record all deeds, conveyances, mortgages and other liens, and all other instruments of writing required by law to be recorded in their offices. Acts , 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, December 20, Over time, the legislature added new records related to real and personal property for the county clerk to file and record.

After Texas became a state, the first legislature directed the county clerk to record "all deeds, mortgages, conveyances, deeds of trust, bonds, covenants, defeasances, or other instruments of writing, of or concerning lands, tenements, goods and chattels, or moveable property of any description in his county" Acts , 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 12, Following adoption of the Constitution of and restoration of the office of county clerk, the legislature enacted statutes giving the county clerk the duty to record any written instrument relating to real or personal property required to be filed Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art.

In addition to recording deeds and other written instruments, the legislature assigned the county clerk other duties related to real and personal property, including maintaining indexes to the recorded instruments. The clerk also recorded acknowledgments of deeds and received the acknowledgment books of notaries public when their terms of office expired.

The clerk recorded and indexed chattel mortgages and, early in the twentieth century, recorded automobile registrations. File indexes, , , , , , 31 volumes. Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, , 4 volumes. Acknowledgment records of notaries public, , 21 volumes. Identify the item and cite the subseries , Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records.

The First Congress of the Republic of Texas directed the clerks of the county courts to "be the recorders for their respective counties, and it shall be their duty to record all deeds, conveyances, mortgages and other liens, and all other instruments of writing required by law to be recorded in their offices" Acts , 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, December 20, File indexes maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office relate to real and personal property and date , , , , and The volumes are titled with various names, including index, filing index, reference index, clerk's file index, and clerk's file docket.

Information varies slightly among the volumes; however, it generally includes the date of the instrument, names of the parties, date filed, nature of the instrument, and the book and page number where the instrument is recorded. Later volumes include a reference number for each entry. The volume dated is an transcription copy of the original Volume 1. It was completed in accordance with an law, which allowed a county clerk to transcribe a true and correct copy of a record or index when the original became "defaced, worn, or in any condition endangering its preservation in a safe and legible form" Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter The volumes dated , , and include both direct grantor and indirect grantee indexes.

The types of instruments indexed in these volumes include deeds, bills of sale, mortgages on "Negroes," powers of attorney, copies of wills, and deeds of trust. Volumes dated after also include abstracts of judgments, writs of attachment, bonds, agreements, transfers of liens, and releases. The first Texas legislature assigned to the county clerk the responsibility for creating and maintaining an alphabetical index to "all books of records wherein deeds, mortgages or other instruments of writing concerning lands and tenements are recorded.

Acts , 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 12, Following restoration of the office of county clerk in , the legislature enacted statutes directing the county clerk to properly index the real and personal property records filed in his office Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art.

Internally, the volumes dated and are arranged chronologically by the date the instrument was filed. Internally, the volumes dated and after are arranged chronologically by filing number. Identify the item , File indexes, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Deed book transcriptions, , 2 volumes. Transcription copies of two original deed volumes recorded and filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office date January May The transcription of Book 1 was completed in ; the transcription of Book 2 was completed in The transcriptions include the deed or other written instrument recorded, which reflects the names of parties, land description, terms of transfer or sale, and date of transfer; and date filed and recorded.

Both volumes include a certification signed by the clerk attesting that the record was "truly and correctly transcribed" from the original volume. Volume 1 includes indentures on deeds of trust, reflecting land pledged as collateral on loans. Volume 2 includes deeds and other related written instruments. The Galveston County Clerk's Office maintained deed books, which recorded deeds, mortgages, conveyances, deeds of trust, bonds, covenants, defeasances, or other instruments of writing relating to real and personal property, dating back to the formation of the county.

Because these books were in continuous use, sometimes a clerk needed to replace the book with a transcription copy. An law allowed a county clerk to transcribe a true and correct copy of a record when the original became "defaced, worn, or in any condition endangering its preservation in a safe and legible form" Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter Identify the item , Deed book transcriptions, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records.

In Texas, for written instruments relating to real property to be recorded, the grantor or person executing the document is required to appear before an authorized individual and acknowledge that he or she executed the instrument for the purpose and consideration represented.

Various individuals were authorized to take the acknowledgments, including the chief justices of the county courts during the Republic, commissioners appointed by the governor following statehood, appointed notaries public, judges, and county clerks. Record books of acknowledgments and proofs of written instruments taken by various Galveston County clerks date and include date of acknowledgment; date of instrument; kind of instrument; if acknowledgment of real property instrument, description and location of property, names of grantor and grantee, name and residence of grantee, and names and residences of witnesses; amount of fees collected; and name of officer taking acknowledgment.

After adoption of the Constitution of , the Texas Legislature assigned to county clerks the duty to acknowledge the execution of any deed or other instrument in writing, to take the separate acknowledgement of married women when the law required such an acknowledgment, and to take proofs by witnesses to deeds, written instruments, or conveyances Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art. In , the legislature consolidated into one statute the requirements for taking acknowledgments and proofs for all who were authorized to do so, including county clerks and notaries public Art.

An law required anyone authorized to take acknowledgments and proofs to keep a record in a "well-bound book" in which he was to enter a brief description of the instrument Acts , 14th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter Identify the item , Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. McMahan and P. Wren, Record of acknowledgments, January January The notary public in Texas is a constitutionally created office.

The first state constitution Art. V, Sec. Notaries were authorized by law to administer oaths and acknowledge written instruments. Acts , 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 13, An law required anyone authorized to take acknowledgments and proofs to keep a record in a well-bound book in which he was to enter a brief description of the instrument Acts , 14th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter Record books and public papers of various notaries publics commissioned for Galveston County date and include date of acknowledgment; date of instrument; kind of instrument; if acknowledgment of real property instrument, description and location of property, names of grantor and grantee, name and residence of grantee, and names and residences of witnesses; amount of fees collected; and name of officer taking acknowledgment.

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The volumes were filed with the Galveston County Clerk's Office when the notaries' terms of office expired. Following adoption of the Constitution Art. IV, Sec. Their appointments were for two-year terms. Their particular duties included taking acknowledgments or proofs of all written instruments entitling the instruments to be filed with the county clerk, taking the examination and acknowledgment of a married woman conveying or charging her separate property or the homestead she shared with her husband, the administration of oaths, and the taking of proofs and acknowledgments of instruments of commerce and navigation.

Each notary was required to keep a book of all official acts. The law further stipulated that when a notary vacated his office, all of his record books and public papers were to be deposited with the county clerk Acts , 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 36; codified at Art. In , the legislature consolidated into one statute the requirements for taking acknowledgments and proofs for all who were authorized to do so, including notaries and county clerks Art. Notaries continued to be appointed by the governor until when the legislature transferred the responsibility to the secretary of state Acts , 40th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 1; codified at Art.

These volumes are arranged by notary in chronological order by date of commission. Internally, each volume is arranged chronologically. Identify the item , Acknowledgment records of notaries public, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Davis A. Spencer, Record of acknowledgments, June September Thomas J. Grover, No.

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Grover and John Adriance, Jr. Chattel mortgages, , undated, , undated, 36 volumes. Indexes to chattel mortgages filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office date and undated and include date of instrument, when filed, name of the trustee or cestui qui trust, mortgagor, and book and page where mortgage is recorded. Two volumes, both titled Book , are indexes to chattel mortgage liens on machinery situated on real property. The first volume listed is undated and includes pages 2 through 39; the second volume listed is dated and includes pages Chattel is movable personal property, such as an automobile or machinery.

A chattel mortgage is a lien on movable personal property to secure a loan. Real property is not chattel. Galveston County is home to a variety of different communities each with their own unique characteristics. Some examples are below. The Clear Creek Independent School District has announced a significant compensation package for its nearly 5, employees. It should be obvious that Galveston County's southern border is on the water. One hundred twenty-four Texas counties including three in Greater Houston impose sales taxes.

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